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Drinkin & Driving
Don't Mix

 
SAFE DRINKING  

If you must drive after drinking, stay completely sober:

  • Don't be fooled. The contents of the typical bottle or can of beer, glass of wine, or liquor drink (mixed drink or straight liquor) each contain virtually identical amounts of pure alcohol. When it comes to alcohol, a drink is a drink is a drink and are all the same to a breathalyzer.
  • Know your limit. If you are not sure, experiment at home with your spouse or some other responsible individual. Explain what you are attempting to learn. Most people find that they can consume one drink per hour without any ill effects. Also, experiment with the Drink Wheel, which is very informative.
  • Eat food while you drink. Food, especially high protein food such as meat, cheese and peanuts, will help slow the absorption of alcohol into your body.
  • Sip your drink. If you gulp a drink, you lose the pleasure of savoring its flavors and aromas.
  • Don't participate in "chugging" contests or other drinking games.
  • Accept a drink only when you really want one. If someone tries to force a drink on you, ask for a non-alcohol beverage instead. If that doesn't work, "lose" your drink by setting it down somewhere and leaving it.
  • Skip a drink now and then. Having a non-alcoholic drink between alcoholic ones will help keep your blood alcohol content level down, as does spacing out your alcoholic drinks
  • A good general guideline for most people is to limit consumption of alcohol beverages to one drink (beer, wine or spirits) per hour.
  • Keep active; don't just sit around and drink. If you stay active you tend to drink less and to be more aware of any effects alcohol may be having on you.
  • Beware of unfamiliar drinks. Some drinks, such as zombies and other fruit drinks, can be deceiving as the alcohol content is not detectable. Therefore, it is difficult to space them properly.
  • Use alcohol carefully in connection with pharmaceuticals. Ask your physician or pharmacist about any precautions or prohibitions and follow any advice received.

PROTECT OTHERS

Volunteer to be a designated driver.

  • Never condone or approve of excessive alcohol consumption. Intoxicated behavior is potentially dangerous and never amusing.
  • Don't ever let your friends drive drunk. Take their keys, have them stay the night, have them ride home with someone else, call a cab, or do whatever else is necessary - but don't let them drive
  • If you are part of the group that has driven together to at a party, volunteer to be a designated driver and limit your drinking to non-alcoholic beverages.
  • You will find any number of people who will claim that they have driven safely in the past after having a lot more drinks than this time. You don't have to believe them. Judge for yourself if he or she is in a position to drive now. It it your life and you have right to protect it even at the cost of being rude.
  • Be first to admit that you might be a little over drunk if you feel to be so.
  • Innumerable lives are lost on the roads across the world due to drunken driving. Never think that it cannot happen to you.

Be a good host:

  • Create a setting conducive to easy, comfortable socializing: soft, gentle music; low levels of noise; comfortable seating. This encourages conversation and social interaction rather than heavy drinking.
  • Serve food before beginning to serve drinks. This de-emphasizes the importance of alcohol and also sends the message that intoxication is not desirable.
  • Have a responsible bartender. If you plan to ask a friend or relative to act as bartender, make sure that person is not a drink pusher who encourages excessive consumption.
  • Don't have an "open bar." A responsible person needs to supervise consumption to ensure that no one drinks too much. You have both a moral and a legal responsibility to make sure that none of your guests drink too much.
  • Pace the drinks. Serve drinks at regular reasonable intervals. A drink-an-hour schedule is a good guide.
  • Push snacks. Make sure that people are eating.
  • Be sure to offer a diversity of attractive non-alcohol drinks. (For numerous non-alcohol drink recipes, see www.idrink.com).
  • Respect anyone's choice not to drink. Remember that about one-third of American adults choose not to drink and that a guest's reason for not drinking is the business of the guest only, not of the host. Never put anyone on the defense for not drinking.
  • End your gathering properly. Decide when you want the party to end and stop serving drinks well before that time. Then begin serving coffee along with substantial snacks. This provides essential non-drinking time before your guests leave.
  • Protect others and yourself by never driving if you think, or anyone else thinks, that you might have had too much to drink. It's always best to use a designated driver.

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